Essential Reading // REVIEW: Fight Like A Girl by Clementine Ford

Title: Fight Like A Girl
Author: Clementine Ford
Publication Date: July 2018
Publisher: Oneworld Publications
Part of a Series?: No, A Standalone
I Got A Copy Through: Oneworld Publications (THANK YOU!)
Buy Links: Amazon || Barnes and Noble || Wordery || Foyles || Waterstones || WHSmith || Books A Million || Chapters Indigo || Google Books
Blurb Description: An incendiary debut taking the world by storm, Fight Like A Girl is an essential manifesto for feminists new, old and soon-to-be.Online sensation and fearless feminist heroine, Clementine Ford is a beacon of hope and inspiration to thousands of women and girls. In the wake of Harvey Weinstein and the #MeToo campaign, Ford uses a mixture of memoir, opinion and investigative journalism to expose just how unequal the world continues to be for women. Personal, inspiring and courageous, Fight Like A Girl is an essential manifesto for feminists new, old and soon-to-be. The book is a call-to-arms for women to rediscover the fury that has been suppressed by a society that, despite best efforts, still considers feminism to be a threat. Urgently needed, Fight Like a Girl is a passionate, rallying cry that will awaken readers to the fact they are not alone and there's a brighter future where men and women can flourish equally - and that's something worth fighting for. 
“An inspiring, unapologetic, feminist manifesto”Shirley Manson, lead singer of Garbage
Let me just start by shouting out loud: I’m a feminist. I found my inner feminist in my early teens, but because I’m probably the most awkward person in existence at social situations unless I’ve known the group of people for YEARS, I’m not usually very vocal about my feminism and I’ve always been an admirer of the women who can fearlessly put themselves out there and advocate for equality.

Let me also say: I believe, no matter what, that feminism is about EQUALITY, and nothing else. Individuals choose to express their feminism in different ways – out loud, within their own minds, with friends and loved ones – but none of that matter. If you believe that the world as is, is unequal, and want to fight for that equality, you’re a feminist.

CONGRATULATIONS.

Feminism, and what it meant to me, was a fairly simple concept in my head, and I didn’t think a book could teach me more. But when everyone you know on the internet is calling this book a ‘must read’ and a ‘wonderful experience,’ I kind of wanted to see what it was all about.

MY THOUGHTS ON FIGHT LIKE A GIRL:

1.       This is a hard book to review because:
A)      IT MADE ALL THE SENSE IN THE WORLD
B)      In trying to make a point, Clementine Ford repeated the same point again and again, over multiple chapters and so WHILE I LOVED WHAT THE BOOK WAS ABOUT, there’s only so many times I can read the same thing again before getting bored of it.
C)      At the same time, Clementine Ford QUESTIONED, ARGUED, PROVED AND BROUGHT TO LIGHT everything wrong with the way women are treated through situations that women experience everyday and have come to, wrongly, accept as the status quo and this book also BROKE ME with how real it was.

2.       This book is deeply personal AND the work of a genius, in that I don’t think I’m QUALIFIED TO RATE SOMEONE’S VIEWS AND WORLD EXPERIENCES ON A NUMERICAL SCALE BASED ON MY THOUGHTS like I would with a typical fiction book, and especially not one that handles a topic so close to my heart. So, I won’t.

3.       I will, however, say this: Fight like a Girl is an INSPIRING book that will make you THINK about everything you, as a woman, go through in this world. Fight like a Girl unapologetically tackles double standards, rape culture, sexuality, men, social media backlash and most of all, why it’s okay to be angry.


Would I recommend this book? Yes. Pick it up for yourself, all the women, and even the men in your life. It’s essentially a call-to-arms to make our society a more equal place and EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ IT. 

Clementine Ford
Clementine Ford is a freelance writer, broadcaster and public speaker based in Melbourne. She writes on feminism, pop culture and social issues.


 

No comments:

Post a Comment