Re-Imagined, Magical Fairy Tales // REVIEW: The Language Of Thorns by Leigh Bardugo

Title: Language Of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic
Author: Leigh Bardugo
Publication Date: September 26th 2017
Publisher: Orion Children's Books
Part of a Series?: A Standalone, but a part of the Grishaverse
I Got A Copy Through: Hachette India (THANK YOU!)
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Blurb Description: Love speaks in flowers. Truth requires thorns.
Travel to a world of dark bargains struck by moonlight, of haunted towns and hungry woods, of talking beasts and gingerbread golems, where a young mermaid's voice can summon deadly storms and where a river might do a lovestruck boy's bidding but only for a terrible price.
Inspired by myth, fairy tale, and folklore, #1 New York Times–bestselling author Leigh Bardugo has crafted a deliciously atmospheric collection of short stories filled with betrayals, revenge, sacrifice, and love.
Perfect for new readers and dedicated fans, these tales will transport you to lands both familiar and strange—to a fully realized world of dangerous magic that millions have visited through the novels of the Grishaverse.
This collection of six stories includes three brand-new tales, all of them lavishly illustrated with art that changes with each turn of the page, culminating in six stunning full-spread illustrations as rich in detail as the stories themselves.

“I was not made for pleasing princes.

Despite the fact that I’m not the biggest fan of short stories or anthologies, when Leigh Bardugo announced that she was writing one for the Grishaverse, completed with ILLUSTRATIONS, I knew I would be reading this book.

Leigh Bardugo is one of my ALL TIME FAVOURITE authors ever since I dove into Shadow and Bone, way back when it wasn’t called that, but it was called The Gathering Dark. I fell in LOVE with the Grisha Trilogy and then when the Six of Crows Duology released, I knew that I would always read this brilliant author’s brilliant books.

If you don’t already know, my main reason for not liking short stories are that they seem so incomplete to me and the minute I get invested, the story is over. Poof. And yet, not once in these reimagined fairy tales did I feel like that. I was either mesmerized by Leigh’s magical writing style, in awe of Sara Kipin’s illustrations or just waiting to see what would happen next.

Let’s break this down story wise:

1)      Amaya and the Thorn Wood:
 I love books about girls with strong hearts who know only to tell the truth and aren’t fooled by frivolities. Amaya was one of these girls and the story of her, a great bear and tales weaved around sadness, love and those who are supposed to love us and sisterhood wrung my heart. I love how this story was told with a stark, honest voice and it was definitely me favourite in the collection.
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2)      The Too Clever Fox:
Before I began this story, I thought it was about Prince Nikolai Lantsov, the prince whose nickname was the Clever Fox. He comes in the Grisha trilogy, makes an appearance in the Sic of Crown duology and now, HE’S GETTING HIS OWN SERIES.

Which is beside the point because this story is all about an actual fox and the wit he uses to survive. There’s a hunter, friendship, love, betrayal and wit that will make you smile.
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3)      The Witch Of Duva:
This story is a reimagined Hansel and Gretel retelling, and it’s reimagined in a way only Leigh Bardugo could. Who is the person at fault? The wicked stepmother, the evil witch or the spineless father? I loved how magic was weaved into this tale, and you’ll get no spoilers from me. Just know that this isn’t your traditional fairy tale.
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4)      Little Knife:
I ADORED this story because for the first time, Grisha power was mentioned and used. This story revolves around tasks set to win the hand of the fairest maiden in the land and the magic that surrounds it all. It’s filled with Tidemaker power and I loved every second of it.
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5)      The Soldier Prince:
This story is a reimagined Nutcracker story with Grisha Fabrikator magic and the spirit of a toy who learns to find his own desires. This is probably one of the more out there stories in this collection, but I loved it anyway.

6)      When Water Sang Fire:
This was my second favourite story in this collection because it had mermaids, sisterhood, music, magic and most importantly, a character who is one of my favourites from the Grisha trilogy and I LOVED EVERY SECOND OF IT. Also, IS SHE STILL ALIVE AND WILL WE BE MEETING HER IN THE NEXT PART OF THE GRISHA SERIES?


A mystical, magical collection of reimagined fairy tales written in a way only a true master like Leigh Bardugo could, with illustrations that bring words to life. 4.5 stars. 
Leigh BardugoLeigh Bardugo is the #1 New York Times bestselling and USA Today bestselling author of the Six of Crows Duology and the Shadow and Bone Trilogy, as well as the upcoming Wonder Woman: Warbringer (Aug 2017) and The Language of Thorns (Sept 2017). 

She was born in Jerusalem, grew up in Los Angeles, and graduated from Yale University. These days, she lives and writes in Hollywood where she can occasionally be heard singing with her band. 

She would be delighted if you followed her on Twitter, elated if you visited her web site, and fairly giddy if you liked her selfies on Instagram
Are you a fan of the Grishaverse? Who is your favourite character? Do you like the Grisha Trilogy better or the Six of Crows Duology? 
Have you had the chance to read Language of Thorns yet? What do you think of it?
 

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